Twas the night before…

Kyle’s third ablation.

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Finding a “starting” place, looking back to the past, is more difficult than I remember. I suppose it’s harder to put challenging times to words, than the race report, podium shot posts of the “on season.” It’s okay. Everything will be okay.

In my previous post, I had mentioned the #willsdynasty work that would get me back this winter and that Kyle would be finding on his trainer throughout deployment. I didn’t intend for that preview to be so literal;

I’m looking forward. To training as “one of the guys” again, and racing as I have before, solo. I know this will be a challenge as a Cat 2. I know I have a lot of work to get my body where I want it to be. Strong and balanced. My sherpa is going on an extended “trip,” yet he’ll be back before I know it. Time for a winter of #willsdynasty.

Well, he was back. And before I knew it.

I got the message at 4am on the Saturday of our team training camp. I had wished him a smooth day ahead {his first real day on deployment} before I went to bed and woke up to, “Yeah, about that…”

So Mr. Less than 1% Chance has defied all odds twice now and got sent home.

I had a lot of people reach out, and most were asking if I was relieved or glad to have him back. Which was interesting to answer. Of course I’m relieved he’s back to be able to handle this issue here, in America, with his cardiologist who knows his heart better than anyone. But am I glad? No, not really.

Being a Navy wife is something I signed up for. I knew there would be times apart. Of course I was sad when he left. I cried like a baby in our monster truck. But I was mentally prepared for six months.   I was in shock when he came back. And it’s not like his journey home was easy. Poor guy was stuck on C17 planes in a hammock, sitting on airfields, or in small airport terminals and customs rooms for 5+ days.

Scary foreign hospital, luckily w/Western trained docs

So he’s back. We had a great meeting with his cardiologist two weeks ago and scheduled his third ablation for tomorrow. So another study and investigation to seek out those bad pathways, and his extra ticks will again be burned.

I think it’s most disheartening for him and I by the lack of understanding of anyone else {including our parents, whom we love} of what is actually happening to him. We don’t blame anyone, as we are bad at explaining it, but it’s frustrating when people hear “heart” and instantly think about heart attacks, blockages, bypasses and stints. That’s pulmonary medicine. His issue is strictly electrophysiological. His bad “pathways” are extra electrical nodes on his heart that fire incorrectly, and off beat from his AV node. They get into a bad circuit and cause his heart to beat at 250bpm. His heart is strong and can sustain that rhythm for a while, but eventually his blood pressure drops {his heart is beating on a different rhythm than it’s pumping} and in those instances, he has to be cardioverted through many joules of electricity to his heart {getting shocked} to bring him back to a normal rhythm. This past time he was able to cardiovert himself through maneuvers he’s tried in the past. He has a 50% success rate at skipping the shock.

He’s had to work hard to be able to prove himself competent to complete his PRT today. His cardiologist said the best thing for him is exercise, yet explaining that to his workplace or my friends is challenging. She finds that most people who quit working out only gain other problems through lack of exercise {issues on the other side of the heart}. She just wants him to make sure he’s relatively close to a hospital and that he has his pill in pocket {beta blocker} incase of an episode. But he was cleared for riding and physical activity. The funny thing is he’s supposed to watch his caffeine intake, yet the Navy is fueled by 2 things, diesel and coffee.

If you want to read further, Wiki is pretty helpful. Supraventricular Tachycardia.

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So what have we been up to? Riding! What else? It’s been a gorgeous fall/winter here in So Cal. I feel so lucky to call this our home. His command is keeping him on shore/staff duty till we figure out what’s happening with his heart, which is great news. Moment Racing had our team banquet at our sponsor, Stone Brewing, and we got a private room at their Liberty Station location. Yummy eats and great beer, paired with the awesome work {if I do say so myself} of Kyle and I on our hammer award project. We are off to Phoenix for Thanksgiving and here for the weekend of shopping madness. I do work retail and have to be at the shop for the craziness! Come visit me, we really do have great deals all weekend. Rides, food at the shop, and extended hours 8-8 from black Friday – Sunday.

GWL – an awesome time back out east.
riding with him to work. he gets a flat. sad face.
tide pool hill repeats on a crisp morning.

I’ve also been doing a little cove swimming here and there. This place still is my favorite in San Diego, and has been extra special lately, with clearer and warmer than usual conditions.

 

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One Comment

  1. March 17, 2015
    Reply

    Hello! My name is Megan McMillan! I'm from England and I'd just like to say it's so lovely to find someone I can relate to with SVT, I have wolff Parkinson white syndrome, SVT (which comes with it) and AVT, and I have done since I was diagnosed with it at 8 years old, I'm now 18 and it's still not fixed after 6 ablations. I'd just like to tell you both that I know how hard it is to go through SVT, and I am so happy to see the strength that people have with what they go through. I know it's hard for me sometimes as it takes over my life, and I have to take tablets on the daily because of it, just know that you're not alone and always be strong!! Thank you for not making me feel alone. Lots of love from England! Xxx

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